Discover an amazing collection of sculptures of national significance

More than fifty years after its foundation, Harlow New Town remains a model for urban design. Much of this is due to the inspiration of Sir Frederick Gibberd, the town's Master Planner.  But Harlow has an extra dimension. More than any other new town, Harlow is known for its exceptional sculpture collection. Sited throughout the town is a collection of sculptures of national significance. In the main squares and precincts, in numerous public buildings and at several schools, sculptures by artists, both famous and lesser known, are to be found.

Head sculpture of Sir Frederick Gibberd.
Portrait bust of Sir Frederick Gibberd by Gerda Rubenstein.

Be stimulated by Harlow’s art and sculpture

Sculptures of the Collection

Sculpture

Bird by Michael Chase

Sculpture

Julia by Gerda Rubenstein

Sculpture

Organic Form by Michael Austin

Relief

Relief by William Mitchell

Sculpture

Runaway Rotavator by Allan Sly

Sheep Shearer by Ralph Brown

Sculpture

Shoal by Will Spankie

Sculpture

Still Life by Fred Watson

Sculpture
The Philosopher by Keith Godwin

 

Harlow's sculpture collection has become as much part of the social history and human geography of the town as its housing, public buildings and open spaces. This is largely the result of the work of the Harlow Art Trust who continues to commission and site sculptures in Harlow.

Sir Frederick’s vision was aesthetic as well as practical; hence, today, his Garden and the Gibberd Gallery, housed on the first floor of the Civic Centre which contains his impressive art collection of twentieth century painters, including the likes of John Piper and Graham Sutherland. At the foot of the stairs sits a Henry Moore Sculpture, ‘Family Group’; a dignified sculpture of mother, father and child, resonating strongly with the reason for Harlow’s existence in the first place.

Driving through pleasant green suburbs, it’s plain to see that sculpture in the living environment is a central feature of the town. Works of all concepts and sizes by Moore, Rodin, Frink, Hepworth and over eighty more stand grandly in prime sites or hover unobtrusively a few yards from suburban doorways. The awe-inspiring stainless steel ‘Solo Flight’ by Antanas Brazdys, dominates a green expanse outside the town centre opposite a venerable church.

A short break in Harlow could indeed refresh you with the green of its vistas and stimulate you with the propositions of its art and sculpture.

Harlow's sculpture collection has become as much part of the social history and human geography of the town as its housing, public buildings and open spaces. This is largely the result of the work of the Harlow Art Trust who continues to commission and site sculptures in Harlow.

A short break in Harlow could indeed refresh you with the green of its vistas, stimulate you with the propositions of its art and sculpture.

Download the Harlow Sculpture Trail

The River Stort Sculpture Trail

Discover some original and stunning sculpture made from a variety of materials along The River Stort Sculpture Trail.

This sculpture trail celebrates Harlow's waterside heritage. Four freestanding sculptures and a glass and metal walkway form the three-and-a-half mile waterside trail along the River Stort linking Parndon Mill to the Gibberd Garden in Harlow.

The sculptures along the trail add a real element of surprise to a waterside walk; each one has a story to tell about the local area. Walkers, cyclists, boaters and art lovers alike can admire these creations alongside the natural beauty of the area. The sculptures are situated at Parndon Lock, Burnt Mill Lock, Latton Lock and Harlow Lock along the River Stort, whilst the raised glass and metal walkway spans the weir at Parndon Mill.

As you explore the surrounding area why not pop-in to Parndon Mill where you can watch artists getting creative in their studios and workshops on special open days and visit the fine art gallery. Parndon Moat Marsh and Maymeads Marsh, two of Harlow’s local nature reserves, are also nearby where you can discover rare species of wildlife.

This sculpture trail celebrates Harlow's waterside heritage. Four freestanding sculptures and a glass and metal walkway form the three-and-a-half mile waterside trail along the River Stort linking Parndon Mill to the Gibberd Garden in Harlow.

Download the River Stort Sculpture Trail

Sanstone sculpture

Flowing Onwards by Angela Godfrey

Wrought iron bridge over the river.
Over The Weir (Footbridge) by Alan Freeman and Karen Murphy
Concrete cast sculpture.

Mill by Nicola Burrell

Sanstone sculptures of three balls.

Short Stort Thoughts by Graeme Mitcheson

Sandstone sculpture

The Flowing River by Anthony Lysycia

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