Visit Maldon for saltmarsh, sea and skies!

Once Maldon stood as a bastion against raiding Viking forces, now the backdrop of sky, saltmarsh and water make this area of the Essex coast a beautiful haven for wildlife, enriched by a resounding history. The majestic Thames Sailing Barges which cluster around the Hythe Quay evoke the days of traditional sail. Promenade Park, on the banks of the River Blackwater, dates from Edwardian times but still continues to delight families today. It boasts a splash park, beach huts and adventure play. The steep climb up Market Hill leads to the historic inns, churches and fine medieval buildings in the town.

Once Maldon stood as a bastion against raiding Viking forces, now the backdrop of sky, saltmarsh and water make this area of the coast a haven for wildlife. The Promenade Park, on the banks of the River Blackwater where the historic Thames Sailing Barges are moored, offers great family outdoor entertainment.

Explore Maldon

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The statue of Byrhtnoth, the fierce Anglo Saxon warrior, commemorates Maldon’s most famous moment in history, the Battle of Maldon in AD991. A specially commissioned embroidery, created 1,000 years later and now on permanent display, depicts the Battle and the story of Maldon.

The town has a strong maritime history as evidenced in the unusual ‘belvedere’ feature on the rooftops of many of the buildings. St Mary’s Church, near the Hythe Quay is known locally as the mariner’s church as it acted as a beacon for sailors navigating the river.

The most striking building in the High Street is the Moot Hall with its balcony and pillars stretching across the pavement. The unique brick spiral staircase leads to the bell tower which affords far-reaching views across the rooftop and estuary landscape. Nearby, the Museum in the Park, The Museum of Power, and the Combined Military Services Museum add to the rich heritage of the town.

Further afield, explore history at Stow Maries Great War Aerodrome, the only remaining World War I Aerodrome with its original buildings intact, whilst the ancient chapel of St Peter’s-on-the-Wall dominates the remote, atmospheric coastline at the tip of the peninsula.

Take a day trip or stay a bit longer, there is plenty to catch the imagination.

The statue of Byrhtnoth, the Saxon warrior, commemorates Maldon’s most famous moment in history, the Battle of Maldon in AD991. The town has a strong maritime history - St Mary’s Church, near the Hythe Quay, known as the mariner’s church, acted as a beacon for sailors navigating the river. Further afield, the ancient chapel of St Peter’s-on-the-Wall dominates the remote, atmospheric coastline at the tip of the peninsula.

Maldon boasts 4 museums showing different aspects of the town’s rich heritage: domestic, military, and engineering. The High Street with its mixture of old and new architecture bustles with shoppers contrasting the more sedate Burnham-on-Crouch.

Take a day trip, or stay longer, there is plenty to catch the imagination.

Highlights of the area

Image of a Thames Sailing Barge with its brown sails open and gliding along the blue waters.

For historic grandeur, the Thames Sailing Barges are hard to beat. Topsail Charters based at the Hythe Quay, offers excursions around the Crouch and Blackwater Estuaries, including birdwatching trips, historical tours, barge races and overnighters.

Pictire of vintage aeroplanes standing in a row ready to take off.

Designated a Conservation Area, the aerodrome is now the subject of a sympathetic restoration project to return it to its former state. The buildings that have been restored include the Pilot’s Ready Room and the Flight Commander’s office, which is now a museum.

Picture of glass displays with various army outfits of varying periods.

This award-winning Museum houses an amazing collection of genuine British military artefacts dating from the 1400s to the present. Discover espionage items, uniforms and equipment including, MK2 ‘Cockle’ Canoe from ‘Cockleshell Heroes’ raid.

More highlights

Colourful image of lots of children having fun in the water splash park.
The riverside Promenade Park is a splendid family attraction. Here, the ornamental and boating lakes, sand pits, skateboard and BMX ramps, pirate galleon, splash park and aerial runway draw youngsters in their droves.
Picture of the exterior of the building showing the balcony with lots of flower baskets.
Originally built in the 15th century for the D'Arcy family, the building features some rather unusual medieval features including a spiral brick staircase and an 18th century courtroom. From the roof you can get some spectacular panoramic views across the Blackwater Estuary.
Picture of a massive old water pump.

This former pumping station houses a giant triple expansion steam pumping engine and many other power-related exhibits. A miniature steam railway operates on the first Sunday each month and at a variety of events taking place throughout the year.

More information

Maldon Tourist Information Centre

Picture of the inside of the room with lots of brochure stands.

The friendly Maldon District TIC team will help and advise you on where to go and what to do. The TIC stocks many interesting walks and maps for you to purchase and make the most of your visit to the area.

Panoramic view of a saltmarsh.

The 75 miles of Maldon District’s coastline form a long distance trail which includes 10 SSSIs,the UK’s oldest chapel, 5 nature reserves, ancient battlegrounds, huge flocks of wading birds, Maldon’s famous Hythe Quay and Promenade Park and miles of distinctive saltmarsh.

Chelmer and Blackwater Navigation

Picture of the Navigation with river boats and barges moored along the canal.

The canal begins in Chelmsford and joins the Blackwater Estuary at the picturesque village at Heybridge Basin, passing through 12 locks. The towpath is walkable and passes the secluded Ulting Church, Beeleigh Falls and Beeleigh Abbey. Boat trips are available from Heybridge Basin.

Explore our county

Picture of the iconic Firstsite building at night.
Discover Essex’s creative spaces. They come in all shapes and sizes and are crammed with artistic treasures, from international names to emerging local artists.
Picture of a sunset over the The Naze waters with some rocks protruding from the water.

Explore our 350 miles of coastline, the longest shoreline of any county in England, a place of surprising wild beauty, rich in wildlife and sprinkled with history and hidden cultural gems.

Essex’s history has been shaped by a wide variety of cultures. Romans, Saxons, Vikings, Normans – all left their mark. Echoes of their influence can still be seen today.
Picture of a cow at the edge of the River Stour and drinking water.
A scenic patchwork of rich farmland speckled with pastelwashed villages of thatch and timber, the views interrupted by mighty oaks and ashes presided over by the hurrying skies.